Cruise Ship Britannia

7-50am, and the Britannia is steaming past Britannia – well to precise at this moment, St.Leonards and is relatively speaking, close in at 13 miles and on passage from Bergen in Norway and making for Southampton for an 11am docking.  She is easily identified by her twin funnels.

 

The MV Britannia is a cruise ship of the P&O Cruises fleet.  She was built by Fincantieri at its shipyard in Monfalcone, Italy.  At 143,000 GT, Britannia is the largest of seven ships currently in service with P&O Cruises and she is also the flagship of the fleet.  She officially entered service on 14 March 2015, and was named by Queen Elizabeth II.  Britannia features a 94 metres (308 ft) Union Flag on her bow, the largest of its kind in the world.  A beautiful looking ship but cruising wouldn’t be my choice – all that frivolous consumption would be at odds with my environmental beliefs!

Length: 330 m   Capacity: 3,647 passengers         Cost: £473 million            Speed: 21.9 knots (40.6 km/h; 25.2 mph) @ 136 rev/min.

Birdwatching Update – for Me!

During this month of May, I have twice visited the RSPB’s reserve at Dungeness to bird watch – something I haven’t done per se for many years – my former work and time always requiring me to look at the ‘bigger scene.’ Presumably due to our changing climate, these two outings were something of an update for me personally. Firstly, I saw a pair of Great Egret fly across a marsh, these, I have never seen in this country.  Awhile later I witnessed 5 hobbys in view at once!  These used to be fairly rare summer visitors but are now more numerous.  These falcons have spectacular powers of flight, they being able to catch swallows and dragonflies.

Great Egret


Hobby with prey

Just before I was about to get out of bed this morning, another new birding experience – that of laying in bed and watching swifts hawking high above the big oak immediately at the end of the garden – lazy twitching!

 

 

 

 

Ash Dieback Predicted to Cost £15B in Britain

by Hollie Anderson, PR Officer & Celebrity Liaison, The Woodland Trust.

May 6 2019.

Wilting leaves on an Ash tree.

A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Fera Science, Sylva Foundation and the Woodland Trust has calculated the true economic cost of ash dieback in Britain which are staggering:

  • The total cost of ash dieback to the UK is estimated to be £15 billion.
  • Half of this (£7 billion) will be over the next 10 years.
  • The total cost is 50 times larger than the annual value of trade in live plants to and from Britain, which is the most important route by which invasive plant diseases enter the country.
  • There are 47 other known tree pests and diseases that could arrive in Britain and which may cost an additional £1 billion or more.

The predicted costs arise from clearing up dead and dying trees and in lost benefits provided by trees, e.g. water and air purification and carbon sequestration.  The loss of these services is expected to be the biggest cost to society, while millions of ash trees also line Britain’s roads and urban areas and clearing up these dangerous trees will cost billions of pounds.

Dr Louise Hill, researcher at Plant Sciences at the University of Oxford and lead author of the study, said: “The numbers of invasive tree pests and diseases are increasing rapidly, and this is mostly driven by  human activities, such as trade in live plants and climate change.  Nobody has estimated the total cost of a tree disease before and we were quite shocked at the magnitude of the cost to society.  We estimate the total may be £15 billion – that’s a third more than the reported cost of the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in 2001. The consequences of tree diseases for people really haven’t been fully appreciated before now.”

Dr Nick Atkinson, senior conservation adviser for the Woodland Trust and co-author of the paper, said: “When ash dieback first entered the country, no one could have fully predicted the devastating impact it would have on our native habitats.  To see how this has also affected our economy speaks volumes for how important tree health is, and that it needs to be taken very seriously.  It is clear that to avoid further economic and ecological impacts, we need to invest more in plant bio-security measures. This includes better detection, interception and prevention of other pests and diseases entering the country. We need to learn from past mistakes and make sure our countryside avoids yet another blow.”

The scientists say that the total cost could be reduced by replanting lost ash trees with other native trees, but curing or halting the disease is not possible.  They advise that the government’s focus now has to be on preventing introductions of other non-native diseases to protect our remaining tree species.

Background.  Ash dieback is a fungal disease, originally from Asia, which is lethal to Europe’s native ash trees. It was first found in Britain in 2012 and is thought to have been brought to the UK years earlier on infected imported ash trees. It is expected to kill 95-99% of ash trees in Britain.